The Mindbuzz

MB:193 with Alehkgee

October 16, 2023 Mindbuzz Media Season 3 Episode 193
The Mindbuzz
MB:193 with Alehkgee
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Alex Gonzalez also known as Alehkgee is a writer and film director from Los Angeles.

https://www.instagram.com/alehkgee/

Ever wondered what it takes to break into the world of film? What ignites the spark of creativity in an aspiring filmmaker? On a captivating episode of Mind Buzz Podcast, we get up close and personal with Alex, a recent graduate and a promising writer and producer. Alex unravels his story, from being awestruck by Hollywood biggies, to drawing inspiration from the Elevate Conference by Chicano Hollywood, and sorting through the rigors of applying for a master's program.

As our discussion unfolds, we navigate a wide-ranging terrain, from Alex's encounters with Hollywood A-listers to the nitty-gritty of film production. We illuminate the stepping stones to launching a short film, the distinction between production and administrative assistants, and the role of persistence in cracking into the industry. Moreover, we engage in a lively debate on the newest horror film remakes and the significance of a solid storyline, revealing our personal movie experiences and perspectives.

As we dig deeper, we touch on the chilling behaviors and crime consequences that sparked some of the iconic movie characters. We dissect the influence of the Writer's Strike and Actor's Strike on the industry and delve into the underbelly of production company terms. Lastly, we confront imposter syndrome, discuss the experiences of first-generation Latinos in creative spaces, and highlight the importance of a supportive community. So, strap in, and join us on this compelling journey that offers a unique insider's look at the film industry.

My Grito Industries
mygrito.net

Subscribe to The Mindbuzz Youtube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIYj7eDCsV3YPzxv7VRKZKg   

Don't forget to follow us on
Instagram @themindbuzz https://www.instagram.com/themindbuzz/ to keep up with our hosts, guests, and upcoming events! 

See you on the next one!

"King without a Throne" is performed by Bad Hombres

King without a Throne Official Music Video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fNhxTYU8kUs

King without a Throne
https://open.spotify.com/track/7tdoz0W9gr3ubetdW4ThZ8?si=9a95947f58bf416e

Speaker 1:

3, 2, 1. What is up mind buzz universe? Welcome back to the mind buzz podcast.

Speaker 2:

Stop laughing, amber really trying to make that one work.

Speaker 1:

I'm making it happen, dude, and we got to make something happen, or can we? Should we just do a poll to see what the mind bus universe wants to be called?

Speaker 2:

what we should call our listeners.

Speaker 1:

I think so, but welcome back to the mind buzz podcast. Mind buzz universe. What is up? Thanks for tuning into another podcast episode and remember that the mind buzz podcast is a part of the my great the podcast network, my great the industries. We got a couple of things that we want to cover before we get into today's podcast episode, and I think amber is going to take the lead on this one.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, all right. So we just have a few updates from our label. So just a reminder la Rosa Noir's new album, arellano, is out now and all listening stream, so go listen to that also. Bad hombres, they have a recent single called el catrin which is freaking awesome.

Speaker 1:

I love the song. Bernard and the guys, bad hombres are kicking ass with el catrin.

Speaker 2:

So it can be found on Spotify and make sure to add it to your favorite music playlist the paranoias. They're playing a free show this Saturday at the grande hill street fair. Hey, that's cool free show. Go check them out if you haven't that's within my budget that's within my budget.

Speaker 2:

Yes, I like it and then, oh, maria Sanchez will be performing this Saturday at the shadow Grove brewing, and if you haven't seen her, you should, because their band is amazing, and so, for more details, go ahead and go follow all of their Instagram accounts, which we will. Why you making me will leave a link and the show description, but yeah, it's our update.

Speaker 1:

That's your Mike Rita weekly update and amber. I do want to highlight what we did the past couple of weeks some press releases. I did a podcast called copy and still podcast out now on YouTube. I also did. I'm being seriously. Title of the podcast episode is clash of the pods, the roast of the mind, buzz, and then just today, yeah me gil from the mind buzz was on emo brown podcast.

Speaker 1:

Please go check it out on YouTube and Spotify. It was awesome, champs. Thanks for having me. I really appreciate it and we had a good time, so go check out that podcast, emo brown. Other than my great though podcast network, the mind buzz, emo brown is also part of the my great though podcast. We have Chicano shuffle. We have West Coast Pop lock podcast that goes a Marcos and am I missing anybody? That's it right cool.

Speaker 1:

Alright, without further ado, let's get into today's episode with our guest Alex. He's an aspiring writer and producer and content creator. He's outing out over here there you go, he's already getting started. Ladies and gentlemen, welcome Alex. Thanks man for being on the podcast.

Speaker 4:

Thank you guys so much for having me here.

Speaker 1:

I'm super excited to be here, you guys, I am just excited, you know way excited yeah because actually my first podcast, really I was gonna ask you have you done anything like this before?

Speaker 4:

I have not. This is my first time, so okay, very excited amber.

Speaker 1:

Be nice to him okay.

Speaker 4:

I am a lot of nice to him okay good, but yeah, dude, welcome.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for coming out. I'm super excited that this is your first podcast and we get to experience that with you first. Thank you so much. Yeah, so you are newly a graduate right and you are starting your masters yeah, so I just graduated from a costly Dominguez Hills this past May.

Speaker 4:

I am right now in the process of submitting my application for my master's program. My major was film and TV production. What I want to go for for my master's is actually either I'm in between two programs, so the first one is a show owner program, or the other one that's writing and producing for TV again. So, yeah, I'm an aspiring producer writer. I have some stuff written that I've done for, like in the past, projects that I've done for school. But right now, like I'm just like trying to keep the ball going, you know. So I don't want to lose the momentum, so keep the momentum going.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it was cool because we I mean, we know Alex on a personal level, but it was also cool to see you at the Elevate conference by Chicano Hollywood. That was awesome it was.

Speaker 4:

There were so many people out there. I was just like just, you know, being in a room full of like Latinos, aspiring aspiring directors, producers, actors, writers, and just seeing people from that level. You know like who was there? It was Edward James Olmos, luis Guzman and Milo Rivera, and then there was like other podcasters, social media influencers, and just knowing seeing like the how they have grown from, like because I mean, obviously they've been in the game for such a long time, you know. So like just seeing like the progress and like their obstacles and like the, the things that they had a phase, it's like, oh, okay, like you know, they're like us to like we, we've gone through the same thing as well. So like just being able to see that and just like, okay, like I can relate, you know right, yeah, and especially to get everybody under one roof for a couple days.

Speaker 1:

It's not easy. So Johnny Murillo did a really good job to get all us creators yeah, it was the same as it did and so we were there Saturday. But how was Friday?

Speaker 4:

Friday was cool yeah, I went for both days. Friday I was, I went with my friend. I invited her, gabriella Banillos, she's also a social influencer, so we both went. I told her, hey, let's go like just to like to network, to meet people, and not just that, but just to like see what we can like learn and take away from that. You know. But it was cool, like like how I was telling like there was a lot of social media influencers, a lot of people that are in the industry already, that they know their ways of like working in the industry, you know, knowing the ropes, and just having them give their feedback to us. It was just like it was nice, you know, just to hear them out as well how did you feel walking out of the place?

Speaker 4:

I was very, inspired yeah, I was like I got this, like it just motivated me to do better, and you know, to be better, you know. So I was just like that, was like that's when it was like, alright, I need to like, just keep going, you know yeah, and it helps to do stuff like this too yeah, definitely especially dude.

Speaker 1:

So Friday was the podcaster type of content creator day, and then Saturday was more they. They had that, the comedy panel, which was cool, alfred Robles oh, I got there today, joey Medina. Oh yeah, you didn't catch that.

Speaker 4:

I didn't catch that Joey Medina?

Speaker 1:

who else was there, jerry Garcia? And am I missing anybody else?

Speaker 4:

there was somebody else, but I can't remember who it was awesome they must have been a patch thanks, amber but yeah, even people like in the industry, like they were there, like it was just, it was cool just having everybody in there in the same roof, it was amazing yeah, I wonder if if he's having anything else. I haven't seen anything but I'm honestly right, yeah, classes recently oh really, yeah, it's actually on what is it Labor Day on November, what?

Speaker 2:

what holiday is it? Yeah, labor Day.

Speaker 1:

Labor Day, oh Saturday oh, that's right, he's doing some classes, yeah. I just heard that on the mind buzz right now.

Speaker 4:

I'm actually going to go, so I ended up.

Speaker 1:

Oh, you are like oh, that's cool.

Speaker 4:

I'm gonna go see what I can do network with people, meet people and, just you know, learn from them, you know how important is that to you like?

Speaker 1:

is that something that you've always thought about doing, like in like conference networking type of style, or?

Speaker 4:

you see, this is the thing with me. I'm a very social person, so, like, when I meet people like, I tend to like talk to them and I'm just I could keep a conversation going, you know. But for like this event that's going on, like I feel like you know there are opportunities there, like why not take it, you know, and you never know who you might meet. So for me it's like it's a win-win, you know have you always been like?

Speaker 1:

that it's hard for me talk to them, yeah.

Speaker 4:

I don't know. Just it comes out naturally like it's just me. That's just who I am. You know like even when I'm with my friends hanging out, they're like damn like you tend to like, you get to like. Just a lot of people gravitate towards me, you know and like I'm very easy going and I'm like, I guess, very approachable, you know so.

Speaker 1:

Amber, like she pushed me. What was it like? Literally pushed me on the ground. No, what day was it? Was it Saturday?

Speaker 1:

yeah so we on Saturday yeah, we went to Chicano comedy fest. Dude, that was so awesome. Oh, shout out Martin Rizzo for for all that and what you did and your hospitality and everything but Paul Rodriguez we're we got VIP section was. It was awesome, we were able to go backstage, all that good stuff. But Paul Rodriguez was like standing right there, all alone right there, and Amber was like I'm gonna go talk to him, I'm gonna talk to him, let's go talk to him. I was like, oh my god, no, because usually that it happens right when you're in spaces like that, you, you have all these talented people that have been doing it for years it's.

Speaker 1:

I mean, I've been watching Paul Rodriguez since I was a little kid dude and he honestly like one of the main comedians that like I would want to be. You know what I mean, like when you're a small Latino kid. It was George Lopez, paul Rodriguez and Joey Medina right, at least for me. But Amber pushed me to go take a picture.

Speaker 1:

Just a picture with him and shaking his hand was like the best thing in the world but yeah, she got me out there and I think that's like right now, what I'm trying to shake off is just like that, that weird anxiety that I get to network and just to say hi, yeah, yeah, yeah, do you have that picture?

Speaker 2:

yeah, we got it.

Speaker 2:

I always think that maybe not Paul Rodriguez is as nervous as you are, but like, when you go into like a networking setting right, everyone's there with that common goal of making connections, meeting someone, doing something in that realm. That I always think like why am I gonna feel overwhelmed or embarrassed or anything if everyone else is probably feeling the same exact thing, right? So we try to kind of have that mentality of we're all here for the same reason, we're all trying to make a connection, be here, and maybe we're all nervous and that's okay. And then I think, like when I got celebrity like I don't really like to go up to celebrities because I always feel like they're probably like here's another picture and that's how I feel, yeah, but I knew how bad you wanted to, like you seen him and you were like well, and I knew that if you weren't gonna go alone, so I said, okay, you know what, I'll muster the courage and I'll go and I'll do it for you, like that was my thing.

Speaker 2:

And I always think like cuz girls always like oh, you're never impressed by anyone, oh, no one ever impresses you, and it's something I'm not impressed. But I think that I always told myself like I'm not less than anybody else and I'm never gonna make myself feel less than anyone else. So pretty much anyone is on the same playing field as I am. Like that's how I feel. Like I'm not saying like, oh, they're not superior because you know they have a career or whatever. But as far as approaching someone, you know it's, I'm not gonna be scared to approach someone cuz I think they're better than I am. Like no, you know. So I don't know, that's my, that's what I go out that's your formula to your approach to something like this.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I just think I'm like they're a human being just like me, they're a person just like me. At some point they struggled. At some point they were me. At some point they saw someone else that they admired and they were me going up to them. So I just think like it's a full circle you know what?

Speaker 4:

that's a good way to look at it, yeah yeah, you know, amber, I can actually relate to that, because what was it like the towards the end of May or the beginning of June I think it was the last day of May I went to LaLive I'm not sure if you know that. So it's pretty much as Los Angeles Latino International Film Festival. I ended up going. There was a premiere in the movie Flamin' Hot. So I was there, right, and there was like these huge top notch producers, directors and everything, and I was just amazed cuz I was like damn, I can't believe.

Speaker 4:

Like I'm here, I'm here, I'm in a room full of amazing people, talented people, tell me why Edward James, almost I'm telling you this guy, he is amazing, alright, like I've seen him in different movies and then with my siblings, like they would like reenact, like starting like colds from like movies, stuff like that, but being in that same room with him, oh my god, like he, literally, like I'm not, I kid you not, dude, he was sitting five seats away from me and to me that was a big deal, cuz I'm like yo, it's Edward James. Almost like this is an icon right here, like he's a legend. So anyways, when I saw him I was so starstruck that I really I couldn't speak. Like he passed by in front of me because he had to go like do like an intro or not, and my friend was like oh, alex, alex, look, edward James, almost so literally like when he passed by me I was just like in shock and I couldn't like move, cuz of how like starstruck I was, you know.

Speaker 4:

But anyways, I didn't get to meet him that day, you know, but I did get to meet him the day of the elevate conference with Chicano Hollywood and being able to just meet him even the rules for like 30, 40 seconds dude, like just him, being able to like have me approach him and just like take a picture with him and just like talk to him real quick, it was just.

Speaker 1:

It made my day, honestly yeah, and I, and especially with like a setting like that, it's at least for me it's easier to approach people because we're all under, you know one, we're in one spot and that's pretty much what the goal is right with. The goal is to network, to talk. Yeah, and I think it was a little bit easier. I was able to go up to talk to Jerry Garcia. I was able to talk to him, me and Alfred. He's been on the podcast before, so and we see him all the time we go to his shows. It's cool to always catch up with him. But talking to Joey Medina and asking him the question because I was, I was ready, you see it, and, dude, I was raising my hand and they're like, okay, no more questions. Like, ah, come on, and like I got off off my chair to go chase him to ask him the question that I had and it was just cool. Like we need stuff like that, like in this community, we need stuff like that oh yeah, definitely do you agree?

Speaker 4:

I agree 110%, because you don't see that me at least now you do but I feel like before you didn't really see a lot of like Latino actors, actresses or like producers or directors, so I feel like it's important, you know so who's who's like your favorite film director right now?

Speaker 4:

well, for me it's ever, ever. Jason was, but he's a director. He's a director producer, really. Um, he's directed a few films. Can you pull up the films that he's on his produce? I'm not too sure you know who's another one, guillermo del Toro oh, I love he's.

Speaker 2:

Yeah amazing okay.

Speaker 4:

I think his last one was Pinocchio. What was it, guillermo?

Speaker 2:

del Toro's, the one that did Pan's Labyrinth, which is one of my favorites.

Speaker 1:

The shape of water uh-huh right never seen it come on. I'm serious, I've never seen it. I think we're watching it tonight okay, oh, you did Hellboy too hell boy green inferno, I believe whoa okay, um, okay, we know what he looks like. Can you get a list of the films?

Speaker 2:

that he's done Pan's Labyrinth the one in the middle of two hands okay. I like him a lot yeah, he's really cool and we just heard recently that he's really nice by a friend that oh nice, had some encounters with him really. Yeah, I don't remember. He said I think I don't remember anything, I can't say the name because he didn't want to know where he worked out. But he said when he used to go up to the gate that he was just like, really nice was I there when you were there you were probably looking at something okay.

Speaker 2:

So, oh yeah, pinocchio is the latest one.

Speaker 1:

Pinocchio, pan's Labyrinth. The shape of water. Wait, hold on. Isn't this okay? Never mind. Shape of water, pacific Rim, have any?

Speaker 2:

curiosities. This is the one that we've seen when their girl was putting all that lotion.

Speaker 1:

The weird one, oh oh, so he did that one. Yeah, it's cool really. Mm-hmm, oh, that's cool.

Speaker 2:

Pacific Rim. How boy nightmare alley, he's Mexican, right yeah yeah.

Speaker 4:

Okay, yes, I'm a chicken filmmaker and author.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, from Guadalajara, Jalisco.

Speaker 4:

Shout out to Guadalajara, Jalisco.

Speaker 1:

They go see your Google's gonna say A recipient of three Academy Awards, three BAFTA Awards and Emmy Award, with his work have been characterized by a strong connection to fairy tales and horror, with an effort to infuse physical and poetic beauty in the group task Okay.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's kind of what the basis of his films are are like fairy tales, but also very like like monster-ish. I wonder where that stems from. I wonder if he makes movies like that, like if it's something I don't want to say a trauma, but maybe a trauma from his childhood or something.

Speaker 1:

I think so because a lot of creativity comes out of just like weird emotions.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

You know what I mean. Dude like, when are you writing anything, right?

Speaker 4:

now I'm about to start, but I've done some stuff in the past, yeah, yeah, because I have to submit some stuff for my master's program. So like I'm in the process right now, like thinking like what do I want to write about? You know so, but hold on, but I'm sorry, I don't mean to get you off. No, sorry, were you gonna say something?

Speaker 1:

No, go ahead, go ahead.

Speaker 4:

No, you see, this is the thing, this is all about you, Alex.

Speaker 1:

Okay, it's all about me.

Speaker 4:

You know, this is the thing like I didn't know, I had it in me, the whole writing thing. Like I remember, like being in school, my professor was like all right, this is the topic. These are the first two pages that I did for you guys, Continue it. So when he told us to continue the writing script, my mind just started like flowing, Like all of these things just started coming into my mind. I'm just like all right. So I started like typing away and like it just came out naturally, honestly for me, I'm just like damn, like I didn't know, I had it in me. You know, like it was insane.

Speaker 1:

So what would you say? That your writing style is like.

Speaker 4:

I would have to say like kind of like, like thriller or horror, because I do like scary movies, because I did actually wrote a short film. It's not a certain thing.

Speaker 2:

It's true that you say that you like thriller or horror. Fyi, sorry, I didn't mean to cut you off, but FYI, I've known Alex since you were what? Maybe I was like eight or nine.

Speaker 1:

She was saying something about diapers no ten.

Speaker 2:

No, he was starting like ten.

Speaker 1:

Oh, okay.

Speaker 2:

But Alex, his parents worked all day and then sometimes we would get home because I'm friends with his sister.

Speaker 4:

I already know what this is like.

Speaker 2:

And Alex every year would decorate the entire house. And here he is, ten-year-old Alex, with all these decorations and he's like putting like like spider webs and then like heads and stuff like that, and they would like take you to go get like props right and then or things that you had from the year before. So he's all like a home alone, ten years old, and we're just like in his sister's room and then we just hear him like like creeping up the staircase and he's putting like things out.

Speaker 2:

And then we come out and he has like a whole cemetery and lights and he's always had this like production, like making something happen for Christmas too, like it is just always him decorating and something. And honestly, I didn't think you. I should have known that you were going to do something with like film and all that, but I didn't. I was just like, oh, maybe I'm going to be an interior designer or something.

Speaker 4:

Now you know what that's funny that you're saying, because my family would always be like, oh, like, you're going to be like a party planner, because I tend to like coordinate a lot of stuff. I don't know, that's just me, you know, and like they're, my mom would always say like, oh, like, you can plan so-and-so's party or so-and-so in Skinsigneta. I'm just like and I'm not no, but yeah, no, I mean going back to that like I'm the type of person that I like to like go all out, you know, especially with like decorating my house for, like, the holidays or stuff like that. At least not right now, just because I haven't had the chance and I've been a little bit busy, but that's usually me during the holidays, so you've always had the creative knack for something like that right, yeah.

Speaker 1:

I have. Where do you think that comes from? Is it just at a boredom? You just want to create a different reality from your own.

Speaker 4:

I mean, I don't know, I just I just get to spark the idea and I just run with it.

Speaker 1:

You know, what do you think most of your imagination comes from?

Speaker 4:

I, just by seeing other things from like people that have done in the past, I'm like, oh, I could do it better, or maybe not even better, maybe different, you know? Yeah, so that's just how I get it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, in the creative like in the creative space, it's hard to be different because there's so like, come on, like there's been hundreds of thousands, millions of people that have been doing this for decades. Right, it's hard. It's hard not to I don't want to say copy anybody, but it's just it's very difficult but also to keep it your own, right, I think that's the hard part too. It's cool to be inspired, but also you got to make it your own.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, and be unique too, you know so.

Speaker 1:

And the cool thing about being unique is like being yourself Exactly, 100% right, Because you're your own person and I'm my own person and, like, nobody else has the same mind as me or idea right. Do you like reading dude?

Speaker 4:

It depends. We're talking about books, no, but we're talking about like an email or like something on some media.

Speaker 1:

that, yeah, no because I've been pushing this book for yeah. I've been pushing this book on a lot of creatives and it's called Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert. Oh my God, dude, it's really good, it is super awesome. She's going to pull it up, and I think we should email Elizabeth Gilbert, because we've been talking about this book for about a year now and we need to get on some like program to where.

Speaker 2:

To it on audio book. That way you don't have to physically sit there.

Speaker 1:

It's really good. She has all these creative concepts to get you to where you need to be, and she's an author. She's just awesome dude, and I encourage everybody to. If you're in a creative space, you want to start, or you are in a rut of writing, of creating something, this is the book to do it.

Speaker 4:

Big Magic.

Speaker 1:

Big Magic, elizabeth Gilbert. But yeah, dude, I just hearing all this creative talk. I like to share that with everyone. So buy the fucking book, or it's on audio book too, and if you need credit, just email me. I'll send you a credit for audio audible.

Speaker 4:

Amber, are you going to read tools or what?

Speaker 2:

Yes, chapter one no.

Speaker 4:

A story telling by Amber.

Speaker 2:

That'd be cool. That's awesome.

Speaker 1:

I think we should get into you reading books to people.

Speaker 2:

Heck, no, why not? No, I'm just kidding, I could. I think I could do it.

Speaker 1:

Let's start to read Chapter one. Yeah, so can you talk about, like what you're writing about right now.

Speaker 4:

Oh well, what do you want to know?

Speaker 1:

Like just the basis.

Speaker 4:

I wrote a short film, or I've done an auto-commercial, too, or like a PSA, like those three things that I've written before.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 4:

So yeah, pretty much for my short film. It's about again, it's a thriller. It's about two best friends. They get into a fight. Well, that's the. I don't want to kind of spoil it, but it's fine. Whatever, just the basis.

Speaker 1:

You don't have to give the ending.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, of course I'm not going to tell you anything about it? Yeah, because I don't watch it. I actually want to bring it to life, though, so pretty much it's called the House Theater. It's about a girl who's in college, she's looking for a job and she wants to start earning money. She wants to help her parents pay bills. You know the mentality of a 20-year-old, 21-year-old. She ends up finding an ad online right away, she submits the application and within the next five, 10 minutes she'll come the next day and meet us up, because I guess the owners are like leaving to Europe, they're going to be gone for three weeks and they need someone to house set the house. So she goes, she's there, she notices that it's like a rich person's house, like a big mansion. They have all these nice things, whatever. Long story short, because I don't want to tell you too much she's in the house and she finds out that she's not alone. Someone else is in there and they're trying to kill her.

Speaker 1:

Oh, my God.

Speaker 4:

That's all I'm going to say because I don't want to spoil it. So very quick, keep in mind this is a short film, though it's like a. It would be like a 20 minute short.

Speaker 2:

How long does like short films, like how long does it actually take to film?

Speaker 4:

Honestly, it just depends. It depends how many scenes you want to have or you're going to have, but yeah, then the location too, where you're going to be filming at. But I want to say just how many scenes you're going to be having.

Speaker 1:

So how many scenes you have really dictates how long a film is.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so, for example, like for the short film that I want to bring to life, it would probably be like three, four scenes, so like four different locations, four different locations.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, okay, and what do you need to start, like, like, how do you even start?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, start from the ground up. How would somebody bring their creative?

Speaker 4:

short film to life. Well, you want to. You need to gather money first. Okay, to do some crowdfunding. See if, like, people want to donate money and then, just so, you would write your script first. Yeah, Okay, the one that I have for the short film is like 16 or 18 pages, I don't remember. Okay, I'll recall it's between those.

Speaker 1:

Okay, it's 12. Okay, it's 12. Come on.

Speaker 4:

The style is double spaced. It's what Just say, courier. I think that's how you say it. Okay, see how you are.

Speaker 1:

I'm nerdy like that. I wanna know all that stuff. I was like is it bold or whatever? Okay, no, it's not bold. Okay, you gotta ask. You remember when you're in high school and your teacher's like oh, what are you doing? Like this is double spaced with like 24 font size. Like what are you doing, kid?

Speaker 2:

Dang, I used to try to like.

Speaker 4:

There was a specific one that they would have us do on the I don't know, I forgot the name of it.

Speaker 2:

New times Roman.

Speaker 4:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

I remember that when you're yeah.

Speaker 4:

Okay, never again. So not that Run us through the process. Of writing.

Speaker 2:

Of from. Okay, so let's say, today you had the money right to start your short film, like how do you start, where do you start? So obviously you have to have an idea right, like a premise, of what you're gonna do. You're gonna write your script, and then what?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so you do crowdfunding, you get money. You obviously have your script before that. You want to start gathering your team, your people that would be down to like your DP, producer, director. You want to start looking for actors, so you want to put out an ad. There's a website called backstage. That's the one that we've used for my school. Or if you know people who are like in the industry or they're trying to be like an upcoming actor, so then why not give them the opportunity? You also want to do location scouting. You want to make sure that you get permits If you're trying to film, whether out in the street or at a building, whatever.

Speaker 1:

Again, permits are really important, so all that responsibility falls on the director or the producer the producer. So you got a level with me. So I don't know what a director does. I don't know what a producer does.

Speaker 4:

What's the difference? A producer is the one that takes care of mostly everything. The producer Of, like, doing a lot of location scouting, budgeting, getting actors yeah, they just do a lot. Man. I mean I just, yeah, they do a lot. The director obviously has the last word. I mean, yeah, they'll team up with the producer. I'm like, oh so, like, like, so what's going on? Like, update me, you know stuff.

Speaker 4:

But yeah, obviously depending on the producer too, like if they want to be involved, and they'll be involved and, like you know, do what they got to do.

Speaker 2:

And then they can have like a writer too, like, or does being a producer kind of go hand in hand with being a writer, or are there films and things that have all a different person for each thing?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so everybody's in charge of their own like jobs. So like, if you're the writer, you're the writer. You're the producer, you're the producer. Director DP Gaffers. So everybody has their job and they know what they got to do. I have gaffer tape, that's it.

Speaker 1:

Do it. That's all I got.

Speaker 4:

You know what it's very expensive too, because I bought some and there's like 20, 25 bucks and it was just for like one. I was just like, damn, can we just use regular? But no, you can't. You can't, though. You need to have gaffer tape when you're in production.

Speaker 1:

Okay, sorry to cut you off, brett, I just want to say hey, I'm cool, I have gaffer's tape. That's all I got. That's the one word he knew what you're talking about.

Speaker 4:

I know the whole time he was just like oh, okay, cool.

Speaker 2:

I got tape. So what's a gaffer, what's a person that's a gaffer?

Speaker 4:

Usually, for example, when you're in production and you see wires everywhere and stuff, just to be safe, you want to make sure that you gaff the tape and you make sure the wires are flat.

Speaker 2:

So there's literally a person that their job is to tape.

Speaker 4:

Literally.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, but they call them a gaffer.

Speaker 4:

And then they just got to move lights here and there and just so that you don't get sued, because if something happens on production or on set, I mean yeah.

Speaker 1:

So is that different from a production assistant?

Speaker 4:

A PA, so pretty much a PA it's. You're literally assisting the producer. So they hey, help me out with this, help me out with that. Like, oh, go grab the actor, the actresses, or hey go get me some Starbucks or something it just depends honestly on the producer.

Speaker 1:

Gotcha okay. So it's like what I did for like 10 years. Okay, got it. Wait, you were an assistant. No, well, in administration, an admin assistant is basically that like copies and write this and an email to this, so okay. So it's basically that that's a production assistant versus like an admin assistant. Okay, I get it, yeah okay, which is not bad.

Speaker 4:

So if you want to start off being a PA like, it's always good because you never know like again you might meet people and they'll spread the word around and if you work really well, then they'll recommend you to like other people.

Speaker 1:

Of course, because you're in the environment, you're learning straight from a producer right, yeah, exactly, I just seen a TikTok of this guy that does.

Speaker 2:

I don't know what he does, but he like moves cameras around, but they use that big like the big crane, you know, like the big arm I don't know what he calls it, but he's like supposedly like really skilled in it now and everything. But he was like saying kind of how he got into that position without like going to school. So he was saying he's like oh, I used to do YouTube videos, things like that. So I decided, hey, I want to get into like production. So he said that he met someone doing like he was a background actor, I guess. And then he met someone that did that and he said that he started like hanging out, you know, around there and that the guy kind of just kept brushing them off. He would like kind of go around, ask questions and then he would make sure to kind of try to be on the films that that person was on. And then one day he was like hey, you know, if you ever need an assistant or someone to assist you, I can help. You don't have to pay me. And the man was like yeah, I guess, like I'll let you know. So he said that he took like for like months didn't hear anything and he nothing. So then this guy went on social media and he was like, hey, I'm the guy that said that I'll do this for free. And he's like let me know, like honestly, I'll do it for free, I want to learn.

Speaker 2:

So finally, I guess the man needed someone and he's like he remembered and he called him and the guy said he's like, I worked for free for like a whole year. He said just to get in. He said but now he's like everybody, like that man uses him for everything. And then other producers and things like that, like other shows, all use him. And he's like you know, you just have to be persistent in what you do. And yeah, it feels like you're bugging them, but you know, there's gonna be a point where they might need you, like you know, and then to learn from him, from that man, and learn fresh and things like that. So I was like, oh, I was like, yeah, it does sound like you're bugging, but I guess, if you're so persistent and willing, like you're willing to do anything to get to what you want. So I was like dang, I don't know about not being paid.

Speaker 4:

But yeah, to work, to not get paid, I mean for a whole year, like did you not have bills to pay or what? Like how did you survive? But that's cool, though, like I mean, was that the only thing that he did? Hell?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, he just works like that one camera. I don't know. It's weird, like I think that camera, that angle, I don't know, maybe I'm wrong or whatever, but it looks like it's like like when people are running down the street or a car. Like it's like big.

Speaker 4:

I know what you're talking about. It's like the camera is like on a dolly and then has a track, so you're tracking the movement of it, of the person I mean. So I mean, I don't know what exact the name is.

Speaker 2:

This one was like an arm, or is it like a crane.

Speaker 4:

Oh okay, I don't want to say the wrong thing, but I mean, I don't know if that would be like a DP, but I would think so. Director of photography, you know, but I don't know if it has a different name.

Speaker 1:

What is that? Director of photography? I've heard DP before.

Speaker 4:

Pretty much you're in charge of like other angles and different angles, so like the camera. So when you're filming you're considered the DP.

Speaker 1:

Hmm, okay, and we're like where do you get the cues and stuff for that? Like, how do you know when to like switch cameras and all that?

Speaker 4:

It just depends of the director's telling you like he's directing you, like, hey, camera one, camera two.

Speaker 1:

So okay, so like, like right now what we're doing. I'm breaking the fourth wall here. Amber's switching the cameras as we're going along In a film type of setting. There's multiple cameras, right, but that's not happening like at the exact moment, right, it's not being recorded live or it's not being switched. Is it all post-production?

Speaker 4:

It's okay. So when they're filming, they have different cameras from different angles and they're just recording the whole thing, the whole thing right so when it's post-production, that's when, like, the editor does his magic, and then that's when the director gives the editor his notes, like, oh, I want this, I want that.

Speaker 1:

Cut to this, when this happens, and all that good stuff.

Speaker 4:

Exactly so. That's why there's like again, during filming there's different cameras from different angles too.

Speaker 1:

Gotcha, when Chicano Hollywood was filming the thing, those scenes in at the shop they had a I don't think you were asleep that, but I was. So one of the actors had like a little tiny microphone, a microphone like a tape to her thigh to get the hill sound of her walking. I thought that was pretty interesting.

Speaker 4:

Oh, wow.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, to capture the sound of that.

Speaker 4:

You would think that they would do that like post-production, with like, yeah, like the Foley, the Foley right.

Speaker 1:

Which is really cool having what's a Foley Foley.

Speaker 4:

So pretty much. It's like, for example, if again the camera could be the camera mic could be very sensitive and maybe it might catch it, maybe it might not catch it. So when you go to the Foley studio like they'll reenact, like the walking movement like stepping or like branches breaking, I'll play

Speaker 2:

this Okay.

Speaker 3:

Does this sound familiar to you? That's Mr Krabs walking in SpongeBob.

Speaker 1:

Can't you just pretend to listen for once in your life and notice how quickly he's moving.

Speaker 3:

It's like it's almost like a dance. You know that's typical of cartoon characters, whose exaggerated movements and behavior call for equally exaggerated sound.

Speaker 4:

Oh, that's cool.

Speaker 3:

Foley artists like Monique or Sana. This is one of the fun challenges of creating sound for animation and, unlike live action movies, it starts with nothing.

Speaker 5:

For live action you have production sound like what they recorded, so you could kind of like be like oh, this is what it sounds like, but in animation it's all up to you.

Speaker 3:

It's like your world to create whatever you want Take Gerr and Invader Zim, a little robot who's shaped like this.

Speaker 5:

Wee-hoo-hoo-hoo. He looks hollow. So for his body I use this, and then for his legs. They look like little cable legs and this is where his little feet and I always had the kettle next to it, so the metal. Can I resonate? And you couldn't kind of hear his body Tick?

Speaker 3:

tick, tick, tick, tick, tick, tick, tick. Appa, the giant mythical beast in Avatar, the Last Airbender.

Speaker 2:

So yeah, that's a Foley artist.

Speaker 4:

Hmm, that's always fun too.

Speaker 2:

The only reason I know that is because Universal Studios, so the sound effect stage, but they had that show.

Speaker 4:

I remember that.

Speaker 1:

Hmm, we passed by that, didn't we Amber?

Speaker 2:

Oh, yeah, yeah, when we went, yeah, it was like a whole Foley studio that he was.

Speaker 1:

So Foley is like just the term of like sound engineering out of nothing.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, yeah, but then that's a whole different department though.

Speaker 1:

Oh damn, dude, there's just so much. There's a lot, dude, it takes a very.

Speaker 4:

I'm telling you like it takes a lot, a lot, a lot to like bring something to life.

Speaker 1:

I hear stories of just like certain like 30 second shots take like a full day of work with all these people and I can just imagine budgeting all the work, the labor, the. It's just.

Speaker 4:

it's crazy to me, bro, and the only reason why it takes long, is because, like you have to worry about the angles, making sure that the camera's working, everything's functioning, the lighting the lighting is very important, man. Like you need to make sure that your lighting is like angle, to certain degrees, certain way, because if not, then you're gonna have like some shadows in the back.

Speaker 1:

What do you think about my lighting?

Speaker 4:

Looks good yeah.

Speaker 1:

Okay, you like actually, actually you could move this a little bit, you know what.

Speaker 4:

On second thought, I just kidding. You can tell me after.

Speaker 1:

Not on air.

Speaker 4:

Looks good, though Good lighting is really good. Oh, thank you, appreciate it.

Speaker 1:

I just found an empty spot and I was just like, oh, throw this here, Throw this here as power right and that's another thing you have to worry about, like power and like say, you're shooting somewhere, like a weird remote location, right yeah, how do you get power? You get a generator. Oh, that's right, but what is it? What didn't that like mess with the sound on the production?

Speaker 4:

So what they'll do is they'll have a generator like 20, 30 feet away and just get like a long extension cord, and then that's where the gaffer comes in. Oh, there you go and they start gaffing, you know so because you've gone to school.

Speaker 1:

For all this knowledge, do you find that movie magic when you're watching movies? Does it take away from all the movie magic?

Speaker 4:

You know what it's funny because I've always been interested in like the whole behind the scenes and like making movie of so and so you know, so like, for me it's always been fascinating just seeing how they bring this to life, you know, and just knowing how it takes a lot for them to like again bring it to life. But for me it's amazing. I love it, you know, I admire it, so it's nice seeing it come to life.

Speaker 1:

So you like seeing it come to life. But it doesn't take away, it just makes it more unique and more.

Speaker 4:

More fun for me, more fun for you.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, have you watched anything?

Speaker 4:

recently I just went to go see the Exorcist. Oh, okay, Um it was, it was cool. It was cool. And if you want to go watch it, go watch it. I would give it a seven out of 10. Really, yeah, okay, just I don't know, it was just different for me knowing that. Okay, oh, I don't want to spoil it.

Speaker 1:

I don't want to say anything, I haven't watched it. Oh, you haven't watched it. Oh then, never mind. No, we honestly, we were trying to figure out what we should watch first. I am a huge Saw fan the I love Saw so we were going to go to the theater but I couldn't make a decision. So we ended up not going at all, Cause I was like, okay, Exorcist or Saw 10. But I just couldn't make up my mind, Okay.

Speaker 4:

Let me say something, something funny. So I'm a film major, film and TV production major, but you know what's funny? That I hardly watch any like TV, any, any movies, and have I ever do get to watch movies. That's because I'm like I tell my friends, hey, let's go here, let's go there, let's go watch a movie, but for the most part I don't watch.

Speaker 4:

I watch movies, and not because I don't want to, it's just because I'm always busy. I'm always doing something, like I always have something going on every, every other day or every day. You know, like when my friends try to hang out with me and they're like hey, let's go do this, I'm like oh, I can't, I got this, I got that, or I have an event, you know. So, stuff like that. But yeah, I mean movies.

Speaker 2:

I get it yeah.

Speaker 1:

But I guess if you do go out to watch something, it's significant because you make the time to go out and watch it, of course, yeah, of course. So Exorcist, what is it called? Exorcist what the Exorcist believer?

Speaker 4:

I believe, believer. Is that what it is?

Speaker 2:

I don't know. Let me look it up.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, you know what's another good movie, which one? I don't know if you guys have seen it, but Blue Beetle.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, we went to go watch it.

Speaker 4:

That movie, oh my God.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 4:

I loved it.

Speaker 2:

Oh my God, exorcist believer.

Speaker 1:

So this compared to original. You like this one.

Speaker 4:

No, oh, this is cool, yeah, all right.

Speaker 1:

What do you think about like new horror films versus like all the originals that used to come out, like this Rosemary's baby, the shining, oh my god. Stanley Kubrick is probably one of my favorite directors. I mean, oh my god.

Speaker 4:

I would have to say that the exorcist, the original one it came out, what like in the 1970 something? Oh yeah, do it. I was scared, yeah, yeah, I Was. I would have to say the original one, though it beats yeah well this is.

Speaker 1:

This is crazy too, because it's like a different story line or something like that. Right Is there? Anything is there? Is there a? Mention of the original in this.

Speaker 4:

No, but you know what, though? The mom comes out.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, that's right.

Speaker 4:

That's right. And then I was watching it and then I was upset. I'm looking, I'm not gonna spoil it. I want to tell you, guys, you guys haven't seen it so I was like damn, what the heck like why?

Speaker 1:

Okay.

Speaker 2:

I hate when I watch stuff like that. You know what movie I really watched. That was a remake. That I really liked was Candyman.

Speaker 4:

Oh, I have not seen that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I really enjoyed the, the remake of it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, what I liked about it the reason why is because we're there's a reason why we go watch those films that are recreated. Now they're, they're reproduced or re-rent. I like it because it's it. It's like a like a time capsule, right Like there's a storyline, that that's in place for this type of movie. What I liked about the candy, the the new Candyman, was they were able to to add in the original actor and the storyline into it, which is super cool. That's why I asked about the Exorcist believer if they had any ties to the, the old movie, the original. I think that's why I like saw, because it's a storyline. Yeah, and John Kramer is in every movie, except for spiral, which we're not gonna get into, because, oh my god, oh my god, I'm just gonna say that right now, chris Rock dude, really bro, why would you do that? But I mean, that's why I liked it, because of that.

Speaker 4:

I Haven't kept up with the saw movies, though.

Speaker 1:

I don't know what was the last time I saw one dude.

Speaker 4:

That's crazy. I think I stopped on the second or third one, really.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah there. There's times where I'm just I get super obsessive over movies or or a certain certain movies, like right now, right, or certain YouTube channels. I get obsessive, that's just my personality. But there was a weekend and we talked to a film director, maybe a few months ago, and I was explaining to him that there was one weekend where I just watched, saw one all the way through nine, just like in a in a weekend. I just get like that, bro, I don't know a.

Speaker 2:

Little marathon going on little marathon ember slept most of the day, but of course, I sleep and then I wake up and he's so watching it, and then I go back to sleep and all the gore you wake up to like screaming Right, yeah.

Speaker 1:

But ember?

Speaker 4:

are you the type of person there's like, oh hey, let's watch a movie, and then like Ten seconds in you're like asleep already?

Speaker 2:

Sometimes. Well, on Saturday I fell asleep. I literally watched the whole fucking movie. Oh my god, and I fell asleep at the end like when all the action happened and everything, so I didn't even see what happened.

Speaker 1:

Have you watched the? I'm sorry we're gonna say no that was it Okay. Yeah, good, oh we did you watch the Texas Chainsaw massacre though? The new one that just you don't watch movies for no idea. Hold on which one, because the the one that just came out. Which one? The Texas Chainsaw massacre.

Speaker 4:

No, there's what. Yeah, there's wait. Can you pull that out, please?

Speaker 2:

There's two like kind of newer, when the origin one, the one that we seen, the leather face, that other face and then the one that we seen at my mom's house.

Speaker 1:

I'm glad you like horror. I feel like, like, when we get creatives like this and the like film realm ember their, their interest is always horror. That's really cool, isn't it? Because Ian's interest is horror as well.

Speaker 2:

I.

Speaker 1:

Updated the the computer yeah.

Speaker 2:

Where is it?

Speaker 4:

y'all lying?

Speaker 1:

I don't believe. No, no, no, no, it's called leather wool, leather face. So there there's a movie called leather face.

Speaker 2:

Oh, there we go. 23 the Texas is just called the Texas chainsaw massacre damn, when did they promote that?

Speaker 4:

because I Feel like it just went straight to streaming service oh.

Speaker 1:

Okay, okay, yeah, maybe that's why I didn't know so there's this one, and then pull up leather face. That one was really interesting.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so this one, alex, is a remake of the original, and then leather face, the one we know, wait hold on, that's 2003. Which one?

Speaker 1:

this one wait, we're talking about the 2023. That's the one my father took me to you see Well, we swear we're not lying. Okay, I think, oh it's 2022. Oh, okay, is it that one?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's this one. Oh yeah, it's on Netflix oh, to check it out.

Speaker 4:

It's really cool.

Speaker 2:

It's good, I like.

Speaker 4:

Is it a series or a movie?

Speaker 2:

It's a movie.

Speaker 4:

Oh In 1974.

Speaker 1:

All right, ladies and gentlemen, if you're listening to this, remember we have a YouTube channel. So if you want to see what we're watching, go to the YouTube channel, please.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, this is the one, oh my god, that's scary.

Speaker 4:

Yeah that's crazy. I've not seen this.

Speaker 2:

That was cool this is, this is that one.

Speaker 1:

And then we seen I like that noise, that, my god, yes, there's signature sound isn't.

Speaker 4:

that's how you know yeah so I mean not so Texas, texas teen saw.

Speaker 1:

Oh leather face came out in 2017 2017, so I. Remember I was leather face for for a Halloween. I think I was like 11 or 12 and I was getting made fun of because I made my own costume, like my aunt. My aunt hold on. My aunt bought me the, the mask and that's all she bought me. So I had to, like, get the apron made my own stuff and I did the apron. I put blood on it and everything and it.

Speaker 1:

I just got me fun over there, like oh who are you like a scary maid and like really?

Speaker 4:

You got creative, though that's good, because these Halloween costumes they be expensive. Man right Dollars a hundred.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, my aunt was. She was like I'm just gonna buy you the mask and that's it. And well Granted, she did get me the like fake chainsaw, which was cool. It's like either the fake chainsaw or the rest of your, get it.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, a butcher knife or something right that one's the one.

Speaker 2:

So this one kind of it shows you like how it started, like why, why he became Texas chainsaw masquerade.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, this. So do you know the? Or the origin story of Of leather fist, like, what, like? So in history there's certain people that Like, like real life events, like it's not to the extent of like Texas chainsaw masquer, but certain things in history like Ed Gein was the, the actual Like. He was the the inspiration for leather face. He was the inspiration for, I believe, silence of the lambs, and then also that one by Alfred Hitchcock oh psycho, yeah, weird guy, can you pull up at game. He did some like weird stuff like he G e I n.

Speaker 1:

I and yes, there we go, creepy dude, but yeah, he was the, he was the main, he was the main guy that they they made though all those movies out of, and it was all real life stuff. Edward Theodore Gein, also known as the butcher of plainfield or the plainfield Ghoul, was an American murderer, suspected serial killer and body snatcher. So he's so like dig up graves and he in his house he had I, I believe he digged up his mothers Grave or something he had her like stuffed in, like a room or something they also like. There are all these different artifacts inside his house, like furniture that was made from bones. He made, oh, lampshades out of skin.

Speaker 4:

Yo, what the hell yeah, model.

Speaker 1:

Oh, that's a model. Yeah, dude, that's crazy.

Speaker 2:

That one's a replica.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but he made it like yeah, he made it what that's at the base of it. That's like a pelvic region. Yeah, dude, but yeah is it who's a mother of most depraved serial killer of all time? I think so. So, yeah, he had like body parts all around his house. Whoa what is? Oh, oh yeah, it's a lampshade made out of skin. Imagine that.

Speaker 1:

But, yeah, dude, he, he was the, the main person that they kind of oh yeah, see, look it. Ed Gein was notorious grave robber and murderer. He inspired the creation of several film characters, including Norman Bates from psycho the other face, texas Chainsaw Massacre. Ed used to steal dead potty parts from nearby cemeteries and especially Specifically used to steal skulls for making makeshift soup bowls, ashtrays and lampshades.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, damn. So I mean, what did they eat? People to know, or is that what I'm here?

Speaker 1:

No, I think dead bodies. Right they were just he didn't there? They're just dead bodies. Eileen war knows, yeah, she's a good one. I wonder who talking about dead bodies.

Speaker 2:

All right one in the. Wait what an air fridge Do you guys ever see, like on tiktok, like those AI ones right where they it's like supposedly the person talking and they're like my name is Do-do-do-do-do and I died on you know. Yeah so I always think, like, like I'll go and I'll Google them right after, cuz I'm like are they real.

Speaker 2:

So I was seeing the other day one where this girl she used to work at a morgue. So she used to work at the morgue and she used to work on the dead bodies, like embalming them and receiving them and all that. So she said that like like she was working there and then at some point she started getting like like, turned on, like sexual feelings towards like bodies that would come in, like especially if they were men and they had like nice Bodies or they looked, you know, handsome, things like that. So she said that she never acted upon it, but until one night she said that she, you know, she was alone. She says she received one of the bodies and he was handsome, so she had sex with the corpse and Wait, how do you the hold on?

Speaker 1:

how do you have sex with the corpse?

Speaker 2:

Well, because a lot of corpse sometimes have that what they call like the rigor mortis, where their body they're, they're dead, but their body is not done dying because, if you really think about it, when you die, your the way that you die or the way that your kind of body works, when dying, it's like it starts like shutting off lights, right, so it starts shutting things because it's like self-combusting, almost Unless you die like of an impact, then your brain gets shattered.

Speaker 2:

But if you die like something, naturally a heart attack or something you don't, really it takes a while for your entire body to kind of Die. So I guess this person has like that rigor mortis where, like he was still warm. So she says that he was still warm and that's what kind of like turned her on was that he was like he hadn't like Completely gone, completely cold or stiff or anything. Well, I mean he was stiff.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's Honestly, that was my whole question. Is Okay, a dead body goes in. What is she writing? Yeah, so is she grinding on here?

Speaker 2:

That's my main question because he was still his, his body was still warm and his blood was still flowing, oh my god. So he wasn't completely like dead.

Speaker 1:

So okay, hold on. But how does it happen like your brain Gets that right, like that? That's what happens to like when, when you're about to do the deed, and, and all these feelings rush to your brain, your brain, oh all these lights, this is happening.

Speaker 2:

The blood to the.

Speaker 1:

Thing.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so I guess that part of his brain still hadn't completely, like, died, so it was still so she got pregnant, so she has sex with him, she leaves whatever, and then she notices late, okay, well, wait, let me tell you so, then later.

Speaker 1:

His funeral is just like, somehow like part of Jerry's finger, and what the?

Speaker 4:

hell yeah so.

Speaker 2:

So then she gets pregnant and then she's like, oh shit, like I got pregnant by like the dead dude. So she confesses to someone cuz she's like, okay, I need to tell someone like what I did. So she tells like a colleague, hey, I had sex with one of the corpses. The colleague, the colleague Reports her and she gets arrested. So she gets arrested, throwing into jail and while she's in jail she has her baby and this bitch. Ask the family for child support. She asked the dead guys family for child's. I.

Speaker 2:

That's what I seen. And then I went on at Google the story and it was real, like there's like like headlines and stuff like that.

Speaker 4:

Whoa yeah this guy.

Speaker 1:

Mexican.

Speaker 2:

No, I don't know what he was.

Speaker 1:

I'm thinking of another race too, but I Won't say it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so I don't know, I need to see a movie about that.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, they need to make a movie.

Speaker 2:

Come on, I like come on, alex, for real.

Speaker 1:

Come on, there you go. There's your researcher.

Speaker 2:

right there on the other side. What would I be called?

Speaker 1:

You'll be my writer. Oh, there you go, there you go. That is wild insane.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I was like what the fuck?

Speaker 4:

does she like not have a boyfriend?

Speaker 1:

They probably got in a fight. They probably got in a fight and she was like ah, fuck this guy and I'm gonna go to work. I'm gonna go work on some overtime then right, she got to work. She Got this body and she was like it's not cheating if he's dead right. That's true, true Dang dude.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah what?

Speaker 1:

but what happens? Like to your like. Why do that like it? Is she Like what's going on mentally with this woman right Like?

Speaker 4:

how. I'm just thinking, like she did, the gender reveal revealed by herself.

Speaker 2:

Damn okay, okay how do you go on? Like no, like okay, let's say her right, she's all fucked up, she screwed up, she did what she did. But that kid like, how do you Go on living your life knowing that your mom did that and that you're a product of a fucking deceased person?

Speaker 1:

I think you don't disclose that to the child.

Speaker 4:

Right, but I mean, eventually the child's gonna be like where's my dad?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, or why is my mom in jail?

Speaker 1:

How long did she get locked up for? Can you look it up? I want to see that. How long do you get locked up for? What is it called?

Speaker 2:

Necrophilia.

Speaker 1:

Come on, it's spooky season. Can we look it up, alex? Yeah, okay. Can't believe we're looking this up.

Speaker 2:

I know the FBI comes into our computer. It's fine put your hands up. They're like where's the dead body?

Speaker 1:

Ever looked enough. It wasn't me check the fingerprints Wasn't me. She's planning. How much jail time does someone oh?

Speaker 2:

You know. You know what I've known. You know what I've learned about myself on this show the unique glasses that I want. I need to go get my prescription read done and to I think I might be a little dyslexic.

Speaker 1:

It's okay. Homero keys. Do you have the? Do you remember a homero keys and all that with the keyboard? Homero keys is the, the middle, the middle keys, like it on the left side is like s, k a skr. I can't see it. But homero keys, girlfriend, how much jail time does someone who you just put necrophiliac jail time? That's fine. It is October. Ladies and gentlemen, on the mind buzz podcast we're looking up necrophiliac Like I can't believe there's a. There's weird.

Speaker 3:

You have to have all these, because people are weird mm-hmm.

Speaker 2:

Time served prison Bureau of Justice.

Speaker 4:

Maybe it just depends what state it happens over yeah, that that's true, do you?

Speaker 2:

remember it says right here 18 months to a fine.

Speaker 1:

It's not in Nevada. Oh, it's not bad what about California?

Speaker 2:

I don't know. Let me see right here.

Speaker 1:

I think the time is more of like how you got, like how you interacted with the Right, because I feel like, oh, that's okay, now we're getting to weird subject.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, but that's it's crazy. That's what I seen on TikTok the other day.

Speaker 4:

After that I was like I'm ready to go to sleep. What's that on TikTok? I don't know.

Speaker 1:

It's either that or weird Indian games that people win feed. Oh yeah, have you got a set of?

Speaker 4:

Oh, my god yeah, all the time I'm just like what, I'm like I want to play too. It looks pretty cool, it looks fun.

Speaker 2:

I know it does.

Speaker 1:

We're getting together. We're going to do a Latino version of a game show like that. We're teaming up with a couple of people to get that going.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, we win that golds in our chapter.

Speaker 4:

Damn. That's a good combo too, so you can never go wrong with that.

Speaker 2:

I agree.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so the basis of the game is. Well, the reason why it started is because you remember going into El Superior or whatever stores, how they have those like big bins of rice and beans. Do you remember as a kid? Do you remember putting your hands, imagine rice like dry rice and just getting it in a tub?

Speaker 4:

of it. Oh my god.

Speaker 1:

So hear me out. What if there's spas like that, yo you pay for? An hour, two hours. Hey, give me a rice room, hey, give me a pinto bean room and you just go in there for about an hour, take off your clothes, get down to your skivvies or whatever. You can wear underwear, I would do it. There's a big tub of just dry rice or beans, whatever you choose and you just lay in there or dip your toes or your feet or your hands or whatever.

Speaker 4:

It's funny that you're saying that, because you said it even when you were a little right, you would put your hands in. It's funny because I still do that. It's like oh man, I still do it and then putting yourself in rice or like if you're having a bad day, you know how. Like when they say like metamina rose, metamina rose no.

Speaker 4:

Like when your phone's like it gets wet and like oh, put your phone in like and rice like you know, para uno, like when you're like having a bad day or like shit's going bad, like put yourself in rice and I don't know, maybe Really Is this a thing.

Speaker 1:

No, I'm just saying like you're saying, that's a spa. Is that an extension of that that?

Speaker 2:

could be the commercial. Alex can fill in the commercial for us. That's the basis of you're right, because when your cell phone gets wet and then they tell you, put it in rice, it'll help it or save it, or something tarnishes, put it in rice. So it's the same concept. You're having a bad day. You want to get something out of your system. Detox.

Speaker 1:

Put yourself in rice. Ok, we got to talk after this because I mean we're going to call it a list, a list, but a list, but I like that.

Speaker 2:

That's funny.

Speaker 1:

But that's the idea and we're sticking to it.

Speaker 4:

You got to make it happen, man, yeah of course, but enough about dry beans and rice.

Speaker 1:

I mean, we took over this episode, I know, but I mean so what are your current like? What are you working on right now? Like, what's the goal at the moment? Because you graduated in May, may, yeah, so you're working on your masters right now, right, so what is that entail?

Speaker 2:

So, actually, and then FYI, alex graduated, and graduated right into a strike, right. What is that? Like you know, what, dude?

Speaker 4:

it's crazy because like, ok, I graduated and I was so excited to like get into the industries, to start like looking for a job and whatnot, and like, literally right when I graduated, the writer strike happened and I'm just like, damn, what a time to fucking graduate. You're like metam en morro, dude. Honestly, that's how I felt, and I'm not going to lie. Like when the writer strike happened I was just like fuck, like now, what? What do I do now? You know? That's why, right now, like I'm looking into like my getting my masters and I have to bring, get a portfolio together so that I can submit it.

Speaker 4:

But yeah, going back to the writer strike, like it obviously it affected me too. I mean, I'm new to the game and everything like get into the industry and whatnot, but it did affect me because I don't have a job right now in the industry. Like I'm going to events, getting invited and stuff like that and just networking and meeting people and that's the most that I could do right now. I mean, obviously it already ended for the writer strike, I know, for the actors it's it's still going on. I guess they had a deal with them, but it didn't follow through.

Speaker 1:

So so, besides the writers, the actors were on strike too.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so at first it was the, the writers, because they wanted better benefits and whatnot. The actors decided to join them as well. But I guess it didn't follow through and the actors are still going strong. They want to get residuals, they want to get again, have better benefits. And then the whole thing with the AI. I don't know if you guys looked into it, but what the? What the production companies are trying to do is they're trying to scan their image so they'll come to work one day, scan their image and then after that I'm like all right, cool, we don't need you, no more, we're going to keep your image and this is for us to keep for the rest of each who was telling us that Somebody was explaining that to us, that that that's why they're they're striking right, because it's pretty much like you come in and then you're like bye, and then the residual was because they're not getting off of streaming, or things like that.

Speaker 4:

Right, exactly so. Like when movies are streaming on, like what is it? Disney Plus, netflix, hulu and like all these other streaming platforms the actors are not getting paid, like they just go get paid for what they got to do and then that's it, like they're not getting residuals from the streaming platforms. And that's why actors are like no, like give us our residuals, like we want our money, you know, and then these companies are just being greedy and just keeping the money and like it's, it's a whole mess.

Speaker 2:

You know that's X.

Speaker 1:

Wow, do you go to work one day and they copy your likeness and then from there Do they send sign like a NDA or anything documented? Hey, are they signing off on their image?

Speaker 4:

I want you know don't quote me on this but I want to say yes, because I mean you have to sign, like legal forms and everything. So I would say yes. Maybe I'm wrong, I'm not too sure.

Speaker 1:

That's probably like in the terms of conditions of getting to work that day, and then it's like in the fine print the far bottom.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, you can't read it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I mean, that's the only way I can see that they would pass that through somebody, right yeah?

Speaker 4:

Whoa that sucks. And they're still going strong. Right now, the actors sack actors. Right now, they're just out there outside the studio companies Walt Disney's, sony Pictures, warner Brothers, paramount Pictures they're, they're just going at it.

Speaker 2:

So what? How? Like? So you're saying, ok, so the the strike's going on, you're going to networking events, you know, you're like, all right, you know, screw it, I'm going to start my masters because, because it's, I mean, the most logical thing to do, right? Well, all of this is happening in continued your education and then, when it's done, you know you'll have that. But, like, how do you even know, like, where to start or where to apply or what to do? Like, obviously, right, you want to produce and write, but you're not. Your first job is probably not going to be a big time producer, right, I mean, unless you do something and then you're seen. But what's the process in? Like, like the industry? Like, because I'm sure that it's not as easy as it sounds, right, it's not. Like, oh, let me go get my dental hygienist license and then you're done, and then you go and you're a dental hygienist. Like. That's not how it works, right?

Speaker 4:

You know what I feel like it's different for everybody, speaking for myself like again, like I just graduated, and right now it's it is hard for me to like get a job, because this is the thing there's jobs out there, they're. They're just not hiring again, you know, because of the whole writer strike. But hopefully, like within the end of the year, maybe next year, that's when they'll start getting people and then, like they'll start having people filling the positions, you know. But for me right now, like I decided to go back to school, you know, because I'm like, ok, but like I want to continue my education, I want to learn more, I want to grow and, you know, just be a better person, be a better producer, writer and whatnot. So I mean, for me it's, it's, it's just a matter of just like, hopefully, once this is all over, then I'll start applying to like jobs.

Speaker 1:

So what are you doing now, besides school? To to, I guess, enhance what you want to do for the future, besides school?

Speaker 4:

just going to events, networking, meeting people and just kind of like exchanging like information and like hey. So what do you do? I do this, I do that Like I just graduated, I'm an aspiring producer, writer. You know, just just talking, mingle and meet people. And that's just how you meet people. You know like make connections as well.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, because that's like super important. I never seen how like the power of networking before is crazy, like I was. We've been like I've been doing this podcast for three years and just this year we've been tapping into networking. You know other than just you know emailing people or DMing people on Instagram like there's nothing like meeting people in real life and inviting them to do something like this.

Speaker 4:

But if I can be honest about networking, like it can get very draining. Like I've gone to these events and you're meeting people and you're just like talking, talking and talking and by the end of the night, when I go home, or like I'm on my way back home, like I just feel like so drained I'm just like I have my music on low or something that I don't even have my music Because of how like drained I feel, you know, but in a good way, though not in a bad way, like I, and I feel like very refreshed. I feel like I took something away from that place. You know, like I met people. I just I got the chance to like meet really cool people who have some really good talent. What's your elevator pitch?

Speaker 1:

Like what that's, honestly, that's hard for me. Like when people say, oh, you have a podcast, what's your podcast about? And it's it's, it's good practice because people want to. They don't want to stand there for 20 minutes explaining like what, what you do, like it's hard right, because you have to smash three years, five years, 10 years of work all into like three minutes. Yeah, how do you do that?

Speaker 4:

You see, for me like I'll, I would be like, oh hey, like for example, say say what you mean.

Speaker 1:

Hey, what's up, alex, how you doing? I'm Gil. Hey, how's it going? My name is.

Speaker 4:

Alex, How's it going Good? Oh, so like. So what are you doing? Tell me about it. I do a podcast.

Speaker 1:

I host the mind buzz podcast. Oh, cool and like what do you guys?

Speaker 4:

talk about there, Like so we interview creatives.

Speaker 1:

We interview musicians, aspiring actors or actors, film directors, pretty much anybody in the creative space. Okay, cool.

Speaker 4:

So like how do you do that? Also like, how long have you been doing this?

Speaker 1:

Wait, hold on. I thought I was interviewing you. How did this turn into?

Speaker 2:

I know right, it was an ambush.

Speaker 1:

I know.

Speaker 4:

It was all planned from the beginning Bringing it back to me as I'm sorry, I didn't mean to get you, okay, no, no, it's good, it's good practice for him though.

Speaker 1:

So it's the mind buzz. I'm also part of a label called my grito. It's a podcast network, so I'm out here looking for potential gas, making connections. I also host events. I am an MC. I also do comedy on the side, so what do you do?

Speaker 4:

Oh yeah, so I'm a producer, I'm an aspiring producer, I'm a writer. Well, actually I wouldn't say I'm an aspiring, I would just say I'm a producer, because you need to have that confidence within yourself.

Speaker 1:

You need to like.

Speaker 4:

let them know. Like I'm a producer, I'm a writer, I'm a contributor.

Speaker 1:

So should I tell people that I am a comedian? Yeah, why not? That's scary, okay, and you?

Speaker 4:

know what. I just I literally talked to my friend about this. I was like, maybe two weeks ago I went to go see her at a play. After the play, we all went to a bar and we were talking about, like what our dreams are. What do we, what do we see ourselves in like five, ten years, you know? And I told her that, like, when I go to events like I I'm not like I do get nervous because, like you see all these like People who are so talented and like they've been in the industry of their actors, their writers, producers or directors Um, I told her, like damn, sometimes people ask me like, oh, so what do you do?

Speaker 4:

That's always a question yeah, exactly. And first she told me, like no, you need to let them know, like, put your foot down and be like, oh, I'm a producer, I'm a writer, content creator, I've done a few projects in the past, I've done this, this and this and just pretty much kind of sell them, you know, like with what you've done in the past. And then, if I mean, if they get interested, like, oh, cool, like, oh, we should link up some time, or like, what are your Instagram handles? Or what your social media handles and stuff Like that and like. That's literally just how you exchange information. One out.

Speaker 1:

Okay, yeah, so put your foot down and okay, that makes sense. Okay, I'm learning stuff here, ladies and gentlemen. Okay, I always get that because I have a friend that I do open mics with his names Frank Blanco. He's a comedian, and that's how he he introduces me to the host of the open mic or host of the event that we are at. And he was like and it's funny, and it's very it's I think about it all the time because it made me feel good at that moment, because we were at an event, it was an open mic. I got there, he invited me out hey, come to this open mic. It's cool, that it's a good area. Come work on your craft, come work on your new material. And and that's how he introduced me he was like hey, this is Gil, it's my friend, he's a podcaster and comedian.

Speaker 1:

And then, like he turn, he turns over to me and he was like that sounds cool, huh, podcaster and comedian. And like I just looked down like yeah, like that's cool, like I appreciate that, but I just never thought of it that way, to where you, you're not trying, you're not aspiring, you, you are what you are doing. And it really spoke to me because I think about this all the time and me and Amber, we have this conversation remember how I Push this a lot is you like, whatever you want to do, you have to be in that mindset already To what you're doing. Say, you want to be an entrepreneur? Okay, cool.

Speaker 1:

What do entrepreneurs do? Right, like what do they eat? Like what? Now, necessarily like those details. But what is an entrepreneur's day look like? What does a director's day look like? You get that, you hone in and you do it. And you just get in that mindset, okay. And I thought about that Okay, like, what do comedians do? Comedians, right, they write, they write, they write, they work their material at open mics, right. So Same thing with any type of creative thing. You, you have to get into that mindset. And Now you saying that it just it, it's turning gears for me now because it's like okay, like I'm not aspiring. Like I Don't try to do something, I'm doing it exactly Okay, and you know what?

Speaker 4:

not just that, but like, yeah, you you have to own. And like, okay, I'm doing this, I'm a producer, I'm producing something. So I am a producer, I am writing this, I am a writer. But not just that, but like, I feel like you also need to understand that the people that you have around you, that people that motivate you, the people that uplift you, the people that clap for you, I feel like that does take a big part in it as well, like your family, your friends, and just knowing that Do you have that support it, you know, it kind of motivates you to also do good and stuff like that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I think too, like a lot of times we struggle with imposter syndrome, right, because we think that that, especially now with, like, social media, you see, something like for me, okay, like when, when I was at the shop and I was doing things for the bakery, right, I wouldn't say I'm a baker, because I didn't feel like I was a baker. I just, I don't know, I managed a bakery, I came up with ideas, I did. And now I look back and I'm like I was. I was, I was leading a team, I was coming up with ideas, I was coming up with recipes, I was coming up with those, but I never called myself that. Why? Because I always thought, no, I don't, I don't.

Speaker 2:

I didn't go to school like a baker, I don't do it 24-7 like a baker. So I was like second-guessing myself, right, I was putting all these limitations of other people that maybe I looked up to or wanted to emulate, and I was like I'm not there yet. So then my imposter syndrome kicked in to where I was like I'm just faking it, like I really don't know what I'm doing, and that's always my thing, like even when people say like, oh, that's cool, you, you do this on the podcast and I'm like I don't know what I'm doing. I always say that because I always feel like I'm an imposter, like I really don't know what I'm doing, I'm just learning. But you have to sit back sometimes and, like you said, alex, like like you are writing, you are directing, I am helping produce this show, like no not helping you are why I'm producing that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so that's what I'm saying. Like I think imposter syndrome kicks in big time with all of us, because we feel that we're not to the level of someone that we may see or you know, or Emulate or or just on social media we're not there. So we're like, no, we're just faking it, but in actuality it's like there's really. There shouldn't be a bar or a level or anything. You are a podcaster, you are a Director, writer, producer. I am producing a show like it doesn't matter to what extent, what level, but you are doing the act of whatever it is Exactly.

Speaker 4:

That was beautiful down.

Speaker 1:

That was well said can you, can we write that down and put that on the refrigerator?

Speaker 2:

Got it.

Speaker 4:

Morning cold every day.

Speaker 1:

No, but it I mean that we have to remind ourselves, especially with, with something like this in this creative space, right like it, it just gets crazy, on on, on so many levels, and by crazy I mean you just have to believe in yourself and believing that what you're doing is actually real. Oh, yeah, big time. So tell me about. Are you good on time? Yeah, you're okay. Okay, so I Do want to get into your, you being a first-generation.

Speaker 4:

Latino.

Speaker 1:

Latino in. I'm in this creative space. Like Is there advantage? Is there, is there disadvantages?

Speaker 4:

like tell me about it well, being the first generation left, you know, at least in my household, I'm not. I'm not the first one to graduate in my household. My sister has graduated, so I'm the second one, okay?

Speaker 1:

Was that a lot of pressure from like after your sister graduated by pressure for you?

Speaker 4:

It actually motivated me because I saw my sister, my brother-in-law Graduates, got their bachelors and they got their masters. So I was like, hey, they can do it. I can do it too, you know. But I've always said, I have always told myself that that I'm gonna continue in school and just like, like I want to get a good career, like I don't want to have like a regular not that it's bad, not that it's bad a regular job, you know, like I I, yeah, you know like I want a career, I want to be able to do something bigger and better.

Speaker 4:

So for me it was important for me to continue going to school and just, I don't know, just having that, that support from my family and from, like my friends always pushed me to like to Make sure I got my classes on time and like making sure that I did my homework or like stuff like that, like just having that support it just motivated me. And not just that, but like the group of friends that I have, the ones that I hang out with, like they have their Bachelor's, they're gonna get their masters during the process as well. So just like being around that, around those people, like it motivates me to like.

Speaker 2:

Nothing more important, and I think that that I didn't see this until I was older. But surrounding yourself, like you know, all the time people say like, oh, you don't always have to have friends. I think, exactly like you, like different perspectives are good. Yeah, different perspectives are good, but it's also really good to surround yourself with like-minded people that have goals, aspirations, things like that, because what happens?

Speaker 2:

They motivate you, because you don't want to be left behind, you don't want to be the one to not, you know, have a master's or anything, or even conversations are different than just these things like it's it your circle, like like I would never really thought until when my mom would say, like there's a quote in Spanish that says like dime con quien anda, si te diré quien eres like tell me who you're with and I'll tell you who you are. That's true and it's very true. It's like the people you choose to surround yourself with Really plays a big part in your motivation and and I know people are like, oh, you don't need anyone to motivate you.

Speaker 1:

No, but the the English version to that is show me your friends and I'll tell you who you are. Yeah, right, that's basically the same one.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, that's what it is Okay, pretty much.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but we use. Finish that up, ember.

Speaker 2:

No, that was it.

Speaker 1:

But know that that's important to surround yourself with people, with with goals, that want to do something better than the Situation that they're already in.

Speaker 4:

Right, and they want better to better themselves. You know so yeah that's always good to be.

Speaker 1:

I learned that from Ember. How long have we been together? Probably like four years. We've been together for four years, I think, the first year that we were together. You, you, you were trying to explain that to me and I really didn't understand it, because my friends were my friends, right, but I mean, as years went on, I Wanted to create something. I wanted to do, so I didn't know what, like though, those before I started the podcast or started anything. I've always wanted to do something, but I just didn't have, I didn't know how to navigate like this creativity. I didn't know what to do until I found Till, I found this thing and I was like fuck, this is super cool, right, but it it does help to surround yourself with people that are have that same drive and that same Mindset to create something, whatever. It could be a podcast, it could be movies, it could be writing, it could be comedy, it could be anything.

Speaker 4:

We'll give you that push. Like me, you know, like I'm interested, like what will give you that push to like start this honestly, I was in 2019, going into 2020.

Speaker 1:

The push was I Was always working like that was me. That was my mindset was just work, work, work. I I've already I towards 2017, 18 and 19, I was just a workhorse, I. I Started as an office clerk. I worked my way up to be a salaried manager and I was like, oh, this is fucking cool. Like I I'm a salaried manager, this is what I've worked for my entire life, right, like going to school, learning I Don't know Microsoft. And like I wanted to run somebody's business, right, and be a floor manager and and do all this stuff. So it was that, but that was I've always had this knack for creative stuff.

Speaker 1:

Like I was Writing, I was writing, you know, small jokes here and there, I was reading a lot, but really, what pushed me was the time that the pandemic gave me. It gave me the time to actually Do what I've always wanted to do was create something, and I didn't know what it was until my cousin showed me Joe Rogan's podcast. He showed me the podcast and I was like, what? Like? And I've this isn't a clip. Like I was like whoa, like people actually do this stuff. Like I didn't know what a podcast was until like 2000, 2019, 2020 oh wow and.

Speaker 1:

That that pushed me because I've always wanted to be in, I think, really radio radio personalities Listening to music. I've always been into audio engineering, cutting things, adding things. Before the podcast, I was Producing music and I would show amber like we, we would be in my friend's garage just messing around with with All the instruments and I would record it, and so I've always been into like Audio engineering and all that stuff. But when when they, when I found out what a podcast was, I was like whoa, this is, this is cool, because people, people are doing this anywhere, like anywhere. So I did my diligence and YouTube University and and I got obsessed with it.

Speaker 1:

I think I was just super obsessed with creating something and I found out what I wanted to do and I found out that a podcast is. I Think that's where I need to be and I think that's where my creativeness is gonna get me in. And from there, dude, it was just because a podcast is not just this right like it's it's the production, it's the cameras, it's the audio stuff, it's the Music, it's the publishing, it's the creating, the artwork like getting the gas, getting the get all that like all that stuff, like I, I enjoy, I enjoy doing so.

Speaker 1:

I think this when I found out this particular creative space, I was like whoa, this is what I need to do, this is what I'm gonna do.

Speaker 4:

Damn, that's nice and you went for it, so that's good, I just went for it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and I I know where I think the thing is. I set goals for myself and I told myself I'm gonna. I'm gonna reach these goals, no matter what. Like I've thought about quitting so many times, so many. Even today I thought about quitting. I know I was gonna call you up and be like bro, don't even come cuz I quit today. I would have like I'm already outside right now, but but honestly, like that runs through my mind 24 7. But it's just like I have so much fun doing it, I meet super cool people doing it. And then Thinking back now and me and Amber had this conversation like two days ago about how much we have accomplished in one year, one year, this past year has been probably the best year that I can ever explain why because I just created the time for it.

Speaker 1:

Like I quit my 9-to-5 job a year ago. I quit my 9-to-5 job, corporate job. It was the job that I've always dreamed to have. I dreamed of having that job for seven years. I reached it. There was nowhere else to go, but there was a moment to where I was like I need to do something that I want to do. I've always wanted to be in radio, being podcast or even this comedy thing is another push for me. I was like, okay, I have this podcast. What is something that I can do next to amplify that, to get these creative juices flowing? And that was comedy. So I'm just excited for the future and what me and Amber are going to do in the next year. Like I can only imagine like next year.

Speaker 1:

Amber, a year ago we got you into the producer's seat in the back and you've just amplified this thing that we call the mind buzz. In one year, dude, in one year, we've accomplished so much we're on a label, we've met so many people, we're creating a community, we have sponsors. We have sponsors. This past year has just been phenomenal and I think when those times where I'm like I should quit, nothing's going on, I tell myself to shut up and like, dude, just show some gratitude of where you've been and where you're at right now and what you're going to do in the next five years. That's it. So I think just having that drive and showing gratitude of where you are and where you were takes amount of time. Like that will motivate you more, because if you have something that you want to do just think about, like, how to get there and the journey not necessarily the goal, but just also the journey and how much you're going to have fun towards that goal. And just enjoy it and enjoy it yeah, yeah.

Speaker 2:

And that's something too Like. We had the conversation a couple of days as well. Oh no, it was yesterday and we were on our way to my parents. I was saying, like my toxic trait you know the toxic trait my toxic trait has always been like I have all these ideas, I want to do all these things and I think that I'm just going to wake up one day and I'm going to be that person, or I'm going to have what I'm thinking in my brain, right, and my toxic trait is thinking that and it's like, no, like you have to put in the work, you have to put in the time, you have to put in the effort, and we see all these other again, people that we maybe look up to, or people that are successful in the fields that we want to be in, and all that. And to hear sometimes like their stories, or saying, hey, I've been doing this for five, 10 years and I'm finally where I'm at.

Speaker 2:

It gives you perspective of, like we're in the I always call it like the Amazon era. Like we want everything quick, we want everything to happen overnight, and when it doesn't, it's like we failed, you know, and it's like, no, like, like you have to see how far you've come, to where you're at. Like you're not the same person you were day one. You know when you. Like you, Alex, like you're not the person that you were when you started school. Like when you started school you didn't know what you were getting yourself into and now it's like fast forward and it's like you have all this knowledge and it's like we don't see that because we keep comparing ourselves to other people, to other things, and it's like that's that's the downfall.

Speaker 1:

Today you were listening to Mr Beast right the story of Mr Beast.

Speaker 2:

Yesterday? Was it yesterday? Yeah, that's when we had all these conversations. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Like, honestly, dude, we were, we always have these conversations like every other day, just checking in with each other, like on on creative levels and personal levels, and it just you need to have that type of support to where you can check in with one another, and I think it's just super important in something like this, because it's not easy, like we're, we're trying to tap into an industry that is huge, where there's gatekeepers everywhere and competitive too, so, and very competitive Especially especially, we're in the hub. We're in the hub of the entertainment industry, los Angeles, like that that's that's the hub.

Speaker 4:

Capital, entertainment capital that's what they call it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, and it's just it. It's it's just mind boggling of how many people are and that's who we talk to, like in our community. The people that we have on the podcast is our musicians, our actors, their activists, podcasters. Like we're all trying to to do the we're all trying to break in. Exactly that's what I'm saying, and it's just you need those type of people to to help support you in whatever you do. You need that. That's very important, do you think so?

Speaker 4:

I would agree too. But you know what also helps me? It's following all these podcasters, actors, directors, producers, writers. Just seeing them on my feed on Instagram it's me, because I mainly use Instagram. So just knowing that I'm following them and I'm seeing what they're doing like it motivates me to just like keep going, you know, so just it's important for me.

Speaker 1:

Do you sometimes get to where, like, it's overwhelming, to where you're like, oh, like, of course, amber, we, we, we talk about, like, okay, there there's a certain person that has X amount of followers, x amount of this they're, they're doing all these events and stuff. Like, do you get? Like, do you get discouraged at certain points?

Speaker 4:

You see, for me, social media social media. I don't really care about the numbers. What I care about is me. Let's say I'm putting out, whether it's a photo or a video. I care about the quality. I don't care if I get a lot of likes, if I get two comments, three comments, I'm not that much. I'm not that big on stuff like that. Like I don't really care for it.

Speaker 1:

Okay.

Speaker 4:

Because I know there's other people that get overwhelmed, like oh my. God, I didn't get like 50, 100 likes, 200 likes, and they get so like upset with it, upset with it, but, like for me, I'm just like I don't care, you're just worried about what you're putting out. For me it's quality, Okay yeah.

Speaker 1:

Big time. Yeah, that usually reels me back in because I'll see something and I'm like that. Really, that guy like a thousand likes like come on, dude, like you could have used motion detector on that and your, your, your captions could have been a little bit larger. I mean, his head was going out of frame during this clip, Like weren't you watching that? Like that goes through my head like in a 10 second clip and they got like over 50 shares or whatever like that. Yeah, you know what I mean.

Speaker 1:

I'm just like I'm breaking it down to make myself feel better. Basically, that's what it is Hurt people, hurt people. No, but I I'm not. I'm not saying that. I'm not saying that to discourage anybody, but that's what I see because I make stuff like that, so I know the amount of time that it it takes to create something like that. I don't know. Just I love opus opus clip and I don't like opus clip for certain reasons. But sometimes you just get to what you gotta do, I don't know, sorry, I'm still subscribed to opus clip.

Speaker 1:

I'm just saying there there's certain times where I use it and I don't use it, but it's a. I'm just nerding out right now and complaining Love, hate, relationship with AI. But and again, like AI is opening a lot, like it's cutting down, like workflow times for a lot of people, not just actors and but even in the podcast space. Like AI is like doing a lot of different crazy things they're coming for everyone's job.

Speaker 4:

That's crazy man.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but honestly, like on a creative level, there's nothing like a human touch making clips or generating certain things. I still have to go down and clean up a couple of clips that you know AI has done for me and then even cause. Right now I have a where, like on descriptions and stuff, like it's crazy because I upload, say I upload this podcast right now, like it takes about like 10 minutes for the AI to generate the actual description of the podcast. Dude.

Speaker 4:

Damn. Yeah. That's crazy.

Speaker 1:

It's crazy, but I still have to go in, maybe change a couple of names, change a couple of things there, but it it cut at least hours.

Speaker 4:

So then it doesn't do its fully job, then no, it doesn't.

Speaker 1:

That's what I'm saying. Like, not a hundred percent, you still need that human touch in there, which you're, they're never going to get rid of. I don't think so.

Speaker 4:

I don't think so, no, no I don't know, maybe the next 50 years, 60 years or less, I think less.

Speaker 2:

I think even in 10 years we're going to be able to get 12.

Speaker 1:

So, after I went, when this podcast gets published, go on the YouTube, go on the Spotify. Read the description. That's AI. Ladies and gentlemen, oh yeah. Yeah, but it's cool because it pulls out the keywords, the key topics and all. It's still pretty good, but just know that I still go in there and finesse it a little bit.

Speaker 4:

That's good.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so you still need humans and creative stuff, right? But there's another thing that I do want to talk to you about is so what do you have in the future, like from five years, 10 years, one year from now? Like, what are your goals looking like?

Speaker 4:

Well, hopefully, in a year or so I want to see myself. Well, hopefully I see myself working like in a movie set, film set.

Speaker 2:

Say you will see yourself.

Speaker 4:

Okay, let me rephrase that In less than a year I'm going to see myself in a film set or TV set, just depending what comes my way and I'll be maybe a producer assistant, but I want to be a producer or something. I am a producer when I'm talking about, but I do see myself like on a movie set, hopefully. And that's the ultimate goal.

Speaker 1:

Ultimate. Have you put a timestamp on that, or is it just, ultimately, this is what you want to do.

Speaker 4:

I mean I don't want to put a timestamp because again I'm going back to school. So let's imagine having to juggle both my masters and doing what I'm going to be doing. So it's kind of like it's going to be hard, but it should be manageable.

Speaker 1:

It will be manageable. It is I'm going to be right. Alex, thanks for being on the podcast.

Speaker 4:

Thank you so much for having me.

Speaker 1:

I appreciate it. So go ahead and tell us where we can find you and we have coming up.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so if you guys have Instagram, make sure to follow me at AlecG that is A-L-E-H-K-G-E. Also there's a link up there. I have my IMDB coming soon so hopefully when I start working jobs I know I am They'll be posted there my website as well and then those pictures, videos of stuff that I have done in the past projects, events that I've gone to If you guys start following me, I'm going to be posting like back up behind the scenes of stuff like that. I have an event coming up this Wednesday. I'll be at the Newport Beach Film Festival with Ejonia Derves, the new movie radical, so I'll be there posting stuff and then I have a lot of stuff coming up. Actually, next week I'll be hosting. We're not hosting, but like I'll be the main person I can get to talking and giving Q&A's Giving the Q&A.

Speaker 1:

So you're hosting.

Speaker 4:

There's an E-Frame I forgot, oh my God.

Speaker 1:

The guy giving the Q&A's got it.

Speaker 2:

The Q&A guy.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, the Q&A guy, but anyways it should be, fun it's going to be with all the Waffi's, so it should be fun. And then downtown LA Film Festival. They're having their Film Festival the other of the Morgans and I'll be there as well. So, yeah, I'm excited to have a lot of things coming up. Oof, awesome man, thanks.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for sharing that. It was awesome talking to you, bro. Thank you so much for having me. Of course, we're going to have you again.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, another update. Oh, yeah, for sure.

Speaker 1:

But thank you, alex. All Alex's links will be down in the show description. If you're listening to Spotify or YouTube, please subscribe. Leave a comment. Show some love. Amber and I will be at Orchathedia on October 26th hosting an open mic night, music, poetry, comedy. Come down, wear your costume, come out, support local artists. And then me, I will be in Los Angeles at Accidental Chaos opening up a comedy show Idiot at Jerry's on October 20th at 10 pm, in my pajamas because that is very late, but I will be there opening up the show, so peace out the Mines.

Speaker 1:

Bye, thank you. Yeah, bye, bye, thank you, bye, thank you. Bye.

Writer-Producer Updates and Aspirations
Starstruck, Filmmaking, and Creative Knack
Discussion on Books and Short Films
How to Start a Short Film
Film Production Roles and Responsibilities
Movie Magic and Recent Movie Experiences
Disturbing Behavior and Crime Consequences
Writer's Strike and Pursuing a Masters
Imposter Syndrome and First-Generation Latino
Entertainment Industry Struggles and Goals